Sunflower stalks may sound boring like they are just a source of food or something, but they are great to make into crafts, wind chimes, and many other things you will find on this blog.

Sunflower stalks

Ways To Repurpose Sunflower Stalks

Sunflower stalks are a great source of nutrition and can be used in numerous ways. We have compiled a list of ways to use sunflower stalks below, along with links to extra resources where you can find more ways to use the sunflower stalk.

Turn Them Into A Windbreak

Turn Them Into A Windbreak

The sunflower stalk is an excellent windbreak. It's a sturdy and low-growing plant, you can plant it next to a house or other existing structures, and it will give you a lot of shade while preventing the wind from blowing directly onto your home.

  1. Plant your sunflower stalks in rows at least four feet apart, but more like six feet if possible.
  2. Space the plants about three feet away from each other; this will allow for adequate space for air circulation when the plants are mature.
  3. Water your sunflower regularly. Stalks—at least once a week with about two inches of water per plant—and fertilize them once every three months with an appropriate organic fertilizer such as fish emulsion or bone meal mixed with water at a ratio of 1:1 (one part bone meal to one part water).
  4. Cut any dead flowers or leaves after they have dried up, which can be done by simply pulling them off with your hand or using scissors as needed (the stems should be cut so that they don't touch each other or the ground).
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You may also see our guide: Why Are My Sunflower Seedlings Drooping?

Use Them As Garden Stakes

Use Them As Garden Stakes

Sunflower stalks are a great way to add height to your garden and make it easy to reach plants that are too high for you to reach on your own. They're also useful for creating a temporary fence around your vegetable patch or a low wall around the perimeter of your flower bed.

To Use Sunflower Stalks As Garden Stakes:

  1. Remove seeds from the inside of the stalk and remove any small hairlike protrusions from the outside.
  2. Cut off any damaged parts of the stem.
  3. Then place one stem end in the soil at least 8 inches deep so it's completely buried.
  4. Cover with soil or mulch until no more light can be seen through it.
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Turn Them Into Bird Feeders

Turn Them Into Bird Feeders

Sunflower stalks can be used as bird feeders! Cut the stalks and place them in a mixture of water, cornmeal, and molasses. The seeds will sink to the bottom and stay fresh for several weeks.

Make a Halloween Decoration

Make a Halloween Decoration

Sunflower stalks can be used as a Halloween decoration. It has a strong, rigid structure that can hold up to a lot of weight. It makes it an excellent choice for decorations and other purposes where they must withstand high amounts of wear and tear.

Sunflower stalks are also easy to grow, so you can use them in your garden to make it more interesting or add some color during the season. They come in various colors, so there is no limit to the number of designs you can create with these stalks.

There are many different types of purple flowers for you to choose from, so we've put together a series of some of our favorite color flowers!

Use Them To Build A Small Fence

Use Them To Build A Small Fence

Build a small fence with sunflower stalks. You can use the stalks as an easy-to-build fence to keep your pets from escaping or wandering into dangerous territory. You can also use them as a foundation for your garden or even grow sunflowers in the ground to harvest the seeds for future planting.

Sunflower Stalks Make Excellent Hanging Baskets.

Sunflower Stalks Make Excellent Hanging Baskets

The stems can be cut into 2-3 inch lengths and then bound together with twine or string to form a basket shape. The stalks should be placed in direct sunlight for at least 6 hours per day until they turn yellow and brown before being removed from the sunflower field.

Make an Original Wreath With Sunflower Stalks

Make an Original Wreath With Sunflower Stalks

Sunflower stalks are perfect for making an original wreath:

1. Choose a wreath form you like and remove the leaves from the sunflower stalks.

2. If you have time, let the sunflowers dry out in a dry place for a few days before putting them on your wreath form. It will help them hold their shape when you add them to your wreath.

3. Cut the stems of the sunflowers so they are about four inches long, and tie them into knots at the top of your wreath form using floral wire or string (a piece of twine works well too). Ensure everything is tied, so it doesn't come undone during use!

4. Add some decorative ribbon or twine around the center portion of the wreath form, then add flowers or other embellishments as desired!

You May Also See: Plants Suitable For Dark Rooms

Get Creative and Make Something Out Of Sunflower Stalks

Get Creative and Make Something Out Of Sunflower Stalks

Sunflower stalks are a great way to use leftover seeds, but you can also save them and make something out of them. Here are some ways you can use sunflower stalks:

  • To make a homemade paper straw: Take a sunflower stalk, peel the skin off, and cut it into four pieces. Then take each piece, fold it in half, and twist it. It will give you four small sections of paper straws for your drink!
  • To create a natural bug repellant: Pour olive oil over your hands and rub them together until they're covered in oil – then rub that onto your skin or clothing to repel bugs!

Conclusion

So, whether you're looking to plant sunflowers this season, or change over an old patch of stalks, keep these five tips in mind. You may be surprised by the wide range of ways to use sunflower stalks—and what you learn may even inspire new life for your flower gardens!

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